Private Baptism (General)

by nancyminer @, Saturday, April 07, 2012, 04:33 (1115 days ago)

What is a "Private Baptism?" I have found several records that have this on the baptism records. Also what do the numbers under Register Reference mean (on burials)? I have found four members of the same family that have the same number. Are they burial lot numbers?
It seems like there are a lot of illegitimate births in this area. Does anyone have any idea why?

Private Baptism - previous answer

by slowhands @, proud of his ancient Dean Forest roots, Saturday, April 07, 2012, 07:08 (1115 days ago) @ nancyminer

What is a "Private Baptism?" I have found several records that have this on the baptism records.

http://www.forum.forest-of-dean.net/index.php?id=28944

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Ἀριστοτέλης A Gloster Boy in the Forest of Dean ><((((*>

Register Reference

by slowhands @, proud of his ancient Dean Forest roots, Saturday, April 07, 2012, 07:10 (1115 days ago) @ nancyminer

Also what do the numbers under Register Reference mean (on burials)? I have found four members of the same family that have the same number. Are they burial lot numbers?


They are simply the reference number for the Register "book", not related to burial plots etc

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Ἀριστοτέλης A Gloster Boy in the Forest of Dean ><((((*>

Illegitimacy

by slowhands @, proud of his ancient Dean Forest roots, Saturday, April 07, 2012, 07:13 (1115 days ago) @ nancyminer

It seems like there are a lot of illegitimate births in this area. Does anyone have any idea why?

Statistically I doubt if the rate is any higher, my understanding is that "it is the way things were" and contradicts the moral highground that "we" were told for that period of history !

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Ἀριστοτέλης A Gloster Boy in the Forest of Dean ><((((*>

Illegitimacy

by nancyminer @, Saturday, April 07, 2012, 16:09 (1114 days ago) @ slowhands

Thanks for your help.

Illegitimacy - the moral high ground

by whitecroft1946 @, Sunday, April 08, 2012, 11:21 (1114 days ago) @ slowhands

I have long wondered whether the ‘moral high ground’ that Slowhands refers to was facilitated by the introduction of certificates in 1837; the ‘ground’ did get ‘higher’ towards the end of the century.

In earlier centuries, people rarely ventured more than a few miles from their villages and everyone would know whether a couple had married and whether their children were legitimate or not. By the early Nineteenth Century, transport links were much improved and people travelled more. So who would know if a couple that moved from Staffordshire to the Forest and had a family were married or not (Some of my ancestors did and were!). After 1837, couples seeking to have a child baptised could be asked to show their marriage certificate.

In his ‘English Social History’, Trevelyan introduces another factor – religious discrimination: “By the Marriage Act of 1753, no one could be legally married except by a Church of England parson, an intolerable insult to the religious feelings of Protestant dissenters and still more of Roman Catholics. The Act of 1836 permitted religious ceremonies in Catholic or Protestant places of worship, that should be legally binding if notified to the Registrar.”

The large movement of population to the towns and cities caused by the Industrial Revolution may have necessitated a more ordered society, including the ‘moral high ground’. The two factors mentioned above should perhaps just be regarded as part of this process.

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